Friday, March 24, 2017

Early Spring Wildflower - Bloodroot


Southern Indiana Wildflowers

Common Name:
Blood Root
Botanical Name:
Sanguinaria canadensis
Family:
Papaperaceae – Poppy
Sun:
Shade
Soil:
Moist
Hardiness Zone:
USDA Zone 3 – 9
Propagation:
Seed, division
Flower Time - Southern Indiana:
April
Plant Height:
6" - 8"
Flower Color:
White
Bloodroot is an early spring wildflower that blooms in early to mid April here in southern Indiana. It inhabits the forested hills, its solitary white blossoms forming small colonies of plants in the leaf mould of the woodland floor. Bloodroot will have a single, pure white flower on a stem. The orange-red sap in the rhizome, or tuberous root, is what gives this wildflower its name.
The American Indians used the red sap in the root as a dye. They dyed baskets and clothing with it and it they used for war paint. It is also useful as an insect repellant. The genus name, Sanguinaria, is a Latin term meaning, "bleeding". The name bloodroot is appropriate. The species name, canadensis, means "of English America". Linnaeus gave the species name, canadensis, to the plant because the specimen he obtained came from Canada. It is the only species of this pretty, early spring wildflower known within the genus.
This early spring wildflower blooms only when the shines sun, closing on cloudy days and at night. Bloodroot flowers are short lived. The early spring wildflower blooms only for a week or so from when blooming commences. The pure white blossoms provide the early spring forest with beauty.
Bloodroot is a wildflower for the woodland, preferring the damp locales near a forest stream. Its flowers appear early, before the leaf canopy has developed.  The leaves will expand after flowering and will become very attractive in their own right. They should persist until mid summer, unless there is little rain.
Bloodroot has sort of a complicated propagation regimen. Sow the seed in moist peat, warmed to 68 degrees for 2 - 4 weeks. It must then be cooled four to six weeks to 40 degrees and then raised to 55 - 60 degrees. You may divide the plants immediately after bloom. Use bloodroot in the shaded flower garden or woodland garden, as this early spring wildflower does best in forest setting. 
Excerpted from the Author's Book:

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Gardener”s Guide to the Full Sun Perennial Flower Garden

Gardener”s Guide to the Full Sun Perennial Flower Garden
Gardener”s Guide to the Full Sun Perennial Flower Garden
Gardener”s Guide to the Full Sun Perennial Flower Garden

Gardener‘s Guide to Full Sun Perennials contains complete cultural and propagation information on nineteen perennial flowers suitable for full sun. Gardeners will also find a list of the most popular commercially available varieties for each of the perennial flowers as well.

Available On:
Kindle
Kindle Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords - 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Mossy Feet Books 2016

Common and Scientific Names - A Primer

Southern Indiana Wildflowers

Common Names
Most people know plants by their common names.  It is quite natural that everyone within a locality or region uses these common names. The problem with common names is that they can change from region to region. An example is Belamcanda chinensis. In some areas as people, call it the Leopard Flower, in others as Blackberry Lily. Both are descriptive names, one about the flower, the other referring to the blackberry like seed cluster. However, the name might confuse a scientist or gardener looking for that specific plant by the name, and may not be able to find the right plant for his garden.

Scientific or Botanical Plant Names
In light of this problem, botanists have developed a system of scientific or botanical names. These scientific names are bestowed an International Botanical Congress which meets periodically to devise a new International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN). The International Association for Plant Taxonomy supplies the support for the meetings of this Congress. Scientists use the names bestowed by this Congress are accepted all over the world. The names ensure uniformity for the plant in question.
Carl Linnaeus
Scientific, or botanical, names for plants might seem intimidating to the average gardener. Botanic names comprise Latin, or Latinized versions of words and are used to classify plants in a logical order that tells us where the plant belongs in the vast Plant Kingdom. Common names of plants may change from locality to locality but the botanical name remains the same for plants all over the world. This eliminates confusion if you know the botanical name for the plant you are looking for.
Carl Linnaeus, who lived between 1707 and 1778, devised the system of botanical names. During his lifetime explorers discovered, many new plant species in the Americas and all over the world. He published the first edition of his Systema Naturae in 1735. It is worth noting that Linnaeus devised a scientific system for naming both plants and animals, but his primary love was of plants and gardening.
The System
A gardener need not learn Latin to utilize the knowledge contained within the botanical name of a plant. But it does help the gardener to know the basics of the scientific naming system that Linnaeus devised. Plants are classified according to criteria laid down by this system. The basic system is this - Plant Kingdom/phylum/class/family/genus/species. There are also subkingdoms, subphylums, subfamilies and the like. The only portion of the botanical name that should concern most gardeners is the genus/species portion of the botanical name. This is the name the labels on the plants in the garden center may include. Most of the plants in this guide will have the genus species name, as well as the family to which it belongs. If the plant is a hybrid or variety, that designation will follow the species name.
Standard Names
Thus a popular garden perennial, the New England Aster will be called Aster novae-angliae, Family Compositae or Daisy. Note that the genus name is always capitalized; the species name is lower case. An “X” will designate a hybrid after the species name. A specific variety will have is name preceded by the letters "var" after the species name. A serious gardener should arm themselves with a good plant name dictionary or even a copy of Hortus Third because the authors use botanical names of the various plants in these guides.
Excerpted from the Author's Book:

Southern Indiana Wildflowers

Southern Indiana Wildflowers
This wildflower identification guide includes a full season of common spring, summer and autumn blooming wildflowers with photographs. Southern Indiana Wildflowers allows easier identification of wildflowers in the field because it is arranged by order of bloom and color. 
Though written for southern Indiana, the guide should be useful for those living in southern Ohio and Illinois as well, though there will certainly be regional variations in color and bloom time. 

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Gardener's Guide to the Perennial Meadow Phlox

Gardener's Guide to the Perennial Meadow Phlox


Gardener's Guide to the Perennial Meadow Phlox
Gardener's Guide to the Perennial Meadow Phlox

With its bright, eye popping flowers; native perennial meadow phlox brightens the perennial flower garden in mid-summer. The flowers on this pretty, native full sun perennial appear in June and last well into July.

Written for gardeners by a gardener Gardener‘s Guide to the Perennial Meadow Phlox relates how to grow this beautiful native perennial flower. From seed to division, learn how to propagate this wonderful perennial plant.

© Mossy Feet Books 2016


Available On:
Kindle
Smashwords
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Gardener‘s Guide to Monarda





The unique, lavender flowers of native perennial Bee Balm attract a multitude of butterflies, moths and bees to feed on its nutritious nectar.  Monarda, also known as Bee Balm, is a wonderful addition to the perennial full sun garden.
Written for gardeners by a gardener Gardener‘s Guide to Monarda relates how to grow this beautiful native perennial flower. From seed to division, learn how to propagate monarda
© Mossy Feet Books 2016
Available On:
Kindle
Smashwords
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Google Play
Apple








Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Gardener’s Guide to the Peony

Gardener's Guide To The Peony
Gardener's Guide To The Peony


The peony is one of the most beloved of the spring blooming full sun perennial flowers. The bold, magnificent blossoms enliven the late spring perennial garden.

Tough, long-lived and beautiful, this native of Asia has found its way into perennial flower gardens across the world. Peony hybridizers have developed an almost unlimited array of colors and classifications of this full sun lover. The peony has become beloved by millions of gardeners for its low maintenance requirements and longevity in the garden. Gardener’s Guide to the Peony contains all the information you need to grow this full sun perennial plant. You will find propagation, cultural, and potential problems included, as well as a list of nurseries you can find it.

Peony has many varieties available. You will find the most readily obtainable ones listed in this guide. Gardeners will also find the extensive seed catalog included in this book useful.

The Gardener’s Guide to the Full Sun Perennial Flower Garden Series contains twenty full sun perennial flowers for the home perennial flower garden. The flower guides have the information the gardener needs to grow the plants successfully. From culture, propagation and best varieties, each guide contains complete information on each plant.

Available On:
Kindle
Smashwords
Smashwords - 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
.Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Mossy Feet Books 2016